The following rubrics explain the 11 professional skill areas in which #RyersonSA staff are encouraged to develop or further develop competence in order to achieve a progressively broad, holistic perspective on and approach to our work with and for students. Each competency rubric describes “beginner”, “intermediate”, and “advanced” levels, and includes knowledge, skills, and/or attitudes we should expect ourselves to be able to demonstrate. While reaching advanced level for all 11 areas is not necessarily the goal of these tools, they are designed to provide a framework for professional staff members to realistically reflect on their current competency levels, to consider which areas for development are most appropriate given personal and professional requirements and aspirations, and to self-author their personal and professional development needs.

These competencies, largely based on work from ACPA & NASPA, have been reconsidered, revised, and contextualized for practice in Canadian Student Affairs and within #RyersonSA, specifically. Some are similar to the established ACPA/NASPA rubrics, and some are unique to our work at Ryerson. Recognizing that post-secondary education is a different enterprise in Canada, the #RyersonSA Professional Development committee made considerable effort to “Canadianize” and “Ryersonize” the existing American rubrics. These rubrics will be used in a pilot phase during the 2015-16 academic year, and feedback will be welcomed next summer as we refine them and prepare for a 2016-17 formal launch. Following, the rubrics will be updated and revised as needed, and additional competency areas will be explored as new needs emerge.

Advising & Helping  |  Student Learning & Development  |  Ethics & Legal Responsibility  |  Personal Foundations |

Leadership  |  Equity, Diversity, & Inclusion  |  Human & Organizational Resources  |  Assessment, Evaluation, & Storytelling |

Tech, Social Media, & Digital Engagement  |  Empathy & Emotional Intelligence  |  The 5 #RyersonSA Pillars  |  Reflection Questions |

Advising & Helping  Advising & Helping


All #RyersonSA staff advise and help students at various times and in various ways. Though the specific instances of our providing support may differ, these skills, knowledge areas and attitudes should be used as a guiding framework for further developing our competence in these critical areas.

BEGINNER

One should be able to:

  • demonstrate basic helping skills such as active listening, facilitating reflection and understanding nonverbal communication.
  • assist others in problem solving, decision-making & goal setting.
  • identify their limitations & seek additional resources as needed.
  • recognize their own world-view, but need assistance in knowing how it impacts their performance in helping situations.
  • have awareness of advocacy efforts and know where to locate accurate and helpful holistic well-being information.
  • encourage student development in knowledge of resources and understanding of advocacy efforts.
  • locate information needed to make informed and “warm” referrals to other resources as needed.
  • know when and with whom to intervene and implement crisis management protocols; follow protocol, sometimes with assistance.

INTERMEDIATE

One should be able to:

  • engage in intermediate helping skills such as knowing appropriate levels of challenge and support, perceiving unspoken dynamics in a group setting, identifying patterns of behavior and managing conflict and mediation.
  • assist both individuals and groups in problem solving, decision-making and goal setting.
  • assist others with identifying resources and providing professional development needs.
  • demonstrate culturally sensitive advising, helping & coaching.
  • facilitate advocacy efforts; develop accurate and helpful holistic well-being information.
  • advise or lead efforts for student involvement in the promotion of resources and advocacy goals.
  • be knowledgeable of information required to make informed and “warm” referrals to other resources as needed.
  • consistently follow crisis response protocol without assistance; take part in the decision to initiate crisis intervention responses.

ADVANCED

One should be able to:

  • design and implement training strategies to teach others developmental helping skills.
  • design and implement effective advising services for individuals & groups.
  • provide and arrange necessary development for staff to enhance their helping and advising skills.
  • teach others about culturally sensitive advising, helping, coaching, etc.
  • develop and implement advocacy efforts; add to/create new helpful holistic well-being information via research.
  • instruct others on how to make informed and “warm” referrals to others as needed.
  • assess crisis protocols to make adjustments; coordinate institution/department-wide response process; provide effective post-crisis response.

Student Learning & Development Student Learning & Development


#RyersonSA has responsibility to provide developmental support to accompany students’ classroom learning. This competency area addresses concepts and principles of student development and learning theory. Student Affairs professionals should understand and know how to apply existing theory to their work with students, and #RyersonSA should acknowledge its unique opportunity to contribute to the development of new Canadian-based student development and learning theory.

BEGINNER

One should be able to:

  • identify and define types of theories (i.e. psychosocial, cognitive, etc.); articulate theories that describe the development of university students and their learning processes.
  • identify limitations in existing theories and models; identify limitations in applying existing theories and models to different demographic groups.
  • Articulate their own developmental journey; identify their own informal theories of student development and learning.
  • explore how these “theories-in-use” can be informed by formal theories to enhance work with students.
  • articulate ways in which various learning theories can inform training and teaching practices.
  • identify and construct learning outcomes for daily practice as well as teaching and training activities.
  • facilitate the assessment of teaching and learning.
  • articulate the conditions and practices that facilitate holistic development.

INTERMEDIATE

One should be able to:

  • articulate how differences of race, ethnicity, nationality, class, gender, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, and religious belief can influence student development and learning.
  • discuss the strengths and limitations of existing theories in depth.
  • use current research to design programs/courses and services to promote student learning and development.
  • apply theory-to-practice models to inform individual or unit practices.
  • use learning theory to create learning opportunities; justify the value of using learning theory.
  • construct effective program and/or training curricula that align with intended learning outcomes.
  • design appropriate assessment methods to evaluate their own teaching and learning; use assessment results to inform their own teaching, training, and practice.
  • assist in the development of programs, services, and environments that facilitate holistic development.

ADVANCED

One should be able to:

  • explain student learning and development theory to diverse audiences; contribute to the development of new theory.
  • analyze and critique prevailing theories.
  • use theory to inform policy and practice beyond immediate locus of control.
  • use theory to enhance the understanding of student affairs work among internal and external audiences.
  • teach others to apply learning theory to create learning opportunities.
  • implement professional development opportunities using different learning concepts.
  • evaluate and assess the effectiveness of learning and teaching opportunities of others.
  • develop programs and services that facilitate holistic development and inclusive campus communities.

Ethics & Legal Responsibility Ethics & Legal Responsibility


The application of ethical standards to our work in #RyersonSA is a purposeful goal, assuring that we maintain a common practice and understanding across the division so that we may support one another. Additionally, a basic understanding of relevant legal responsibilities around key student issues is critical.

BEGINNER

One should be able to:

  • have a general understanding of ethical principles of the Student Affairs profession.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the role of ethics, beliefs, and values in personal decision-making.
  • explain how their behaviour embodies ethical principles.
  • identify ethical and legal issues in the course of their job.
  • identify institutional and individual actions that may not be consistent with ethical principles.
  • Identify on-campus resources for support in FIPPA compliance in the creation of new programs, services, procedures, policies, etc.
  • understand the legal obligations students assume when they sign enrollment contracts with Ryerson.
  • assist others with recognizing potential legal and ethical issues in their decision-making.

INTERMEDIATE

One should be able to:

  • recognize the legal and cultural influences of ethical principles of the Student Affairs profession.
  • embody a personal code of ethics within their professional practice.
  • recognize how others’ behaviours embody ethical principles.
  • utilize institutional resources to assist with ethical and legal issues.
  • address institutional and individual actions that may not be consistent with ethical principles and are potentially unlawful.
  • fully understand FIPPA compliance as it relates to the work of their department; serve as local expert assuring that all programs, services, procedures, and policies are compliant.
  • explain to students the legal obligations they assumed when they signed enrollment contracts with Ryerson.
  • assist others in addressing and resolving ethical issues in their decision-making and provides legal resources.

ADVANCED

One should be able to:

  • teach others about legal and cultural factors in applying ethical principles of the Student Affairs profession.
  • implement a personal protocol for ethical decision-making.
  • actively engage in professional development about ethical and legal issues in the Student Affairs profession.
  • contribute to the creation of institutional resources to assist with ethical and legal issues.
  • ensure institutional and individual actions adhere to ethical principles and educates on legal implications.
  • own and explain a broad understanding of FIPPA compliance issues and how they fit in the cross-campus context; teach others methods of FIPPA compliance methods in the creation of new programs, services, policies, and procedures.
  • Advocate on behalf of students who may require support in issues related to legal obligations they assumed when they signed enrollment contracts with Ryerson.
  • engage with others regarding ethical and legal issues in their decision-making and support the ethical development of other professionals.

Personal Foundations Personal Foundations


#RyersonSA is an environment that invites and expects staff to bring their whole selves to work. To facilitate this, our workplace promotes the development of skills, knowledge, and attitudes required to maintain emotional, physical, social, mental, spiritual, and intellectual well-being. Areas of strength and growth will be examined and new opportunities for development will be encouraged.

BEGINNER

One should be able to:

  • be aware of personal beliefs, attitudes, values, and commitments that help form identity.
  • describe the importance of their professional and personal life, and recognize the intersection of each.
  • know how attitudes, values, beliefs, assumptions, and biases affect one’s work with others; reflect on their own attitudes, values, beliefs, assumptions, and biases in order to achieve harmonious working relationships with others.
  • understand the positive impact of personal wellness; see wellness as comprised of emotional, physical, social, mental, spiritual, and intellectual
  • set meaningful goals for their work.
  • demonstrate openness to the process of inquiry; engage in self-reflection of personal and professional development.

INTERMEDIATE

One should be able to:

  • act in a way that is congruent with features of personal identity, with some awareness of the influence of others (i.e. self, peers, family, or one or more larger communities).
  • identify sources of dissonance and fulfillment in their life and take appropriate steps to seek balance.
  • participate in activities that challenge beliefs of self and others.
  • be aware of available resources, and bolster personal wellness by using available resources and developing goals.
  • focus on wellness of others through relationship building in and out of the workplace.
  • recognize areas of growth, and set goals for meeting identified needs; evaluate progress towards goals and adapt actions accordingly.
  • engage in and record deeper analysis of personal and professional experiences to learn more about self through awareness and insights; begin to apply insights gained through self-analysis and reflection through engaging with others in reflective discussions.

ADVANCED

One should be able to:

  • refashion personal beliefs and commitments in a way that is true to their own self while integrating the contributions of others.
  • serve as a role model and mentor by sharing personal experiences and nurturing others’ competency in this area.
  • proactively seek environments and collaborations that fulfill their personal and professional life; provide support for others to do the same.
  • create and/or facilitate activities that challenge beliefs of self and others; lead others in reflecting upon their attitudes, values, beliefs, assumptions, and biases in order to work well with others.
  • demonstrate keen awareness of the wellness of others; seek to engage with colleagues in a way that is supportive of their wellness.
  • encourage and inspire others in setting and meeting goals.
  • turn thoughtful reflection and conversations with others into positive future action; encourage others to participate in reflective discussions within the work place.

Leadership Leadership


#RyersonSA is deeply committed to developing leadership potential in all students and staff. Beyond the traditional definition of leadership (ie organizational position, authority, supervision of others), we seek to create a global understanding of the word. Understanding how diverse populations affect and are affected by leadership and allowing for everyone to make their individual contributions to our community, in their own ways, are key to the #RyersonSA definition of leadership development.

BEGINNER

One should be able to:

  • describe their strengths and weaknesses as a leader.
  • understand various constructs of leadership and leadership styles; learn to apply different leadership models in situations.
  • recognize others’ leadership styles, and show beginner’s confidence in providing appropriate, timely and constructive feedback on other’s leadership skills.
  • identify barriers to student and staff success.
  • identify important elements of a mentor/mentee relationship.
  • understand basic fundamentals of teamwork and teambuilding.
  • describe basic principles of community building.
  • recognize potential issues and trends within primary work unit.
  • identify how a unit’s resource allocation can affect achievement.
  • articulate mission/vision of primary work unit.
  • explain the advantages and disadvantages of different types of decision-making processes.
  • articulate how decisions are made.
  • be knowledgeable of elements of campus culture.
  • understand the organizational structure of the institution.

INTERMEDIATE

One should be able to:

  • actively reflect upon strengths and weaknesses as a leader.
  • think critically and apply various leadership models to situations.
  • recognize others’ leadership styles and provide appropriate, timely and constructive feedback to colleagues and students on their leadership skills and styles.
  • advocate for removal of barriers to student and staff success.
  • serve as a mentor to students and/or other professionals.
  • promote and facilitate collaborative initiatives and team-building efforts; display this skill in formal and informal meeting contexts.
  • create environments that encourage others to make meaningful contributions to their communities and institution.
  • participate in the planning process for primary work unit and recognize the need for innovative change.
  • implement strategies to meet mission/vision of work unit.
  • plan and organize unit’s resources in the support of unit, divisional, or institutional goals and objectives.
  • utilize the most appropriate decision-making style in situations.
  • participate in activities positively contributing to campus culture.
  • develop collaborative relationships between various parts of the organizational to promote institutional mission or change efforts.

ADVANCED

One should be able to:

  • seek opportunities to develop their strengths as a leader.
  • articulate their own leadership philosophy or style based on an understanding of various leadership models.
  • establish and sustain systems to provide continued leadership development opportunities for colleagues and students.
  • create organizational systems that are designed to anticipate and counteract barriers to student and staff success.
  • establish and sustain systems of mentoring to ensure students and professionals receive the support needed.
  • assess and improve the effectiveness of collaborative initiatives and team-building efforts.
  • lead and enable others to contribute toward the effectiveness and success of their communities and institution.
  • lead planning processes across multiple work units and/or the institution and seek out innovative solutions.
  • develop or promote a shared mission/vision across work units
  • create organizational systems that consistently connect resource allocation to unit, divisional, or institutional goals and objectives
  • bring personnel with different decision-making styles together to identify and act on solutions to issues.
  • create a culture that advocates the appropriate and effective use of feedback systems.
  • plan/lead initiatives that positively add to the campus culture.
  • organize collaborative relationships in order to further institutional mission or change efforts.

Equity, Diversity, Inclusion Equity, Diversity & Inclusion


As articulated in “Our Time to Lead”, Ryerson’s Academic Plan (2014), #RyersonSA is deeply committed to principles of equity, diversity, and inclusion. This is demonstrated by valuing fair and just treatment of all community members, respecting diversity of knowledge, worldviews and experiences that comes from membership in different groups, striving for the equitable, intentional and ongoing inclusion of diversity within every facet of the division. This rubric aims to provide a framework for purposeful development of this competency.

BEGINNER

One should be able to:

  • identify contributions of people similar & different from them.
  • recognize multiple, intersecting identities in self and others.
  • promote and seek opportunities to participate in culturally relevant and inclusive programs, services, and policies.
  • with the input and support of the EDI office, promote structures that identify group memberships of Ryerson students/ professionals and assess their level of engagement/satisfaction; analyze data to identify needs for improvement.
  • demonstrate fair and respectful treatment towards all people.
  • recognize cases of discrimination and harassment.
  • understand the definition and presence of micro-aggressions.
  • develop an understanding of aboriginal history in Canada and at Ryerson, aboriginal teachings, and the impact of intergenerational trauma on the aboriginal community.
  • engage in hiring and promotion practices that are fair, inclusive and nondiscriminatory.
  • recognize how the societal dynamics of privilege and marginalization impact Ryerson students/professionals across multiple, intersecting identity groups.
  • consistently model behaviours that are inclusive and socially just; articulate a foundational understanding of social justice, equity, and inclusion and how these are aligned with Ryerson’s institutional mission and values.
  • seek opportunities to expand knowledge of the definition of culture and how various cultures are defined; recognize how some cultural practices are privileged over others.
  • explore how their socialization as a member of privileged and marginalized groups shape values, attitudes, behaviors and beliefs; participate in training sessions/programs that expand knowledge and offer perspectives different from their own.

INTERMEDIATE

One should be able to:

  • seek opportunities to interact and learn from students and professionals different from themself across group identities.
  • take appropriate action when people are treated differently based upon the biases and assumptions others hold about their membership in various privileged and marginalized groups.
  • design culturally relevant & inclusive practices and policies.
  • with the input and support of the EDI office, design structures that identify group memberships of Ryerson students/ professionals and assess their level of engagement/satisfaction; analyze/disaggregate data to identify areas for improvement.
  • seek to change aspects of the campus environment that do not promote fair and respectful treatment towards all people.
  • intervene in cases of discrimination and harassment; offer guidance, referral and support for victims.
  • make efforts to unlearn biases that hurt receivers of microaggressions; model this unlearning to others.
  • consult with Ryerson’s aboriginal community to learn how their primary unit’s resources/programs/services may not be reflective of, accessible to, and inclusive of aboriginal students.
  • ensure students and staff are treated respectfully, justly, fairly and without bias or prejudice in all employment matters.
  • identify systemic barriers to equality and inclusiveness; advocate for and implement means of dismantling them.
  • consistently model inclusive & socially just behaviours; apply an understanding of social justice, equity and inclusion to actively work to create an inclusive campus environment for students/ professionals across group identities.
  • use knowledge of multiple cultures to design and revise programs, policies and services to meet the needs of students/professionals across the breadth of group identities.
  • continually assess their skills, knowledge, and self awareness around issues of inclusion and social justice; identify and shift personal prejudices and biases; continually deepen their level of multicultural competence across group identities.

ADVANCED

One should be able to:

  • create opportunities for Ryerson students/staff to have meaningful interactions across multiple privileged and marginalized group identities.
  • ensure institutional policies, practices, facilities, structures, systems and technologies meet the needs and support the success of people across the full range of group identities.
  • create ongoing strategic plans for continued development of diversity initiatives and inclusive practices; ensure that competence in these areas is fully integrated into practice.
  • provide leadership in fostering an institutional culture that supports the free and open exchange of ideas and beliefs & identifies and addresses issues of power/privilege.
  • participate in/lead institutional efforts to eradicate the presence of cases of discrimination and harassment on campus.
  • develop and deliver curriculum to teach others about microaggressions; create allies.
  • work collaboratively with Ryerson’s aboriginal community to make campus resources, programs, and services reflective of, accessible to, and inclusive of aboriginal students.
  • revise HR policies and employee handbooks to focus on the demonstrated cultural competence of job candidates.
  • infuse issues of equity, inclusion and social justice in mission, values, policies, practices, programs and services.
  • consistently model behaviors that are inclusive and socially just; lead efforts to continually increase alignment of policies, practices, and programs with institutional inclusion goals.
  • develop effective multicultural training that expands the cultural knowledge students and staff and helps individuals integrate issues of social justice and cultural diversity.
  • continually identify and heal aspects of oppression.

Human & Organizational Resources Human & Organizational Resources


Because student and market demands for services/programs are growing faster than resource availability, there is critical need for #RyersonSA to practice efficiency in its use of human and organizational resources. We must grow competence in our knowledge, skills, and attitudes in the selection, training, supervision, motivation, and evaluation of all student and professional staff. Staff may also seek to master skills related to facilities management, revenue generation, sustainability, and/or crisis/risk management.

BEGINNER

One should be able to:

  • possess awareness/understanding of Ryerson’s recruiting & hiring policies and assist in the hiring process when needed (search committees, developing a job description, etc).
  • apply institutional policies, practices and strategies to employee evaluation and supervision.
  • explain and apply strategies to motivate staff members.
  • possess basic understanding of resource management including financial & human resources, as well as facilities & technology.
  • be aware of tenets & laws related to personal & organizational risk; follow risk management protocols in most situations.
  • be aware of how issues related to environment and sustainable economic development impact their work.
  • Identify opportunities to maximize resources through collaboration.
  • have a basic understanding of #RyersonSA sponsorship & fundraising philosophy and initiatives.

INTERMEDIATE

One should be able to:

  • comply with Ryerson’s recruiting/hiring policies; describe processes to others so they may assist in hiring.
  • apply policies and practices related to employee evaluation and supervision when in a supervisory role.
  • provide coaching and mentoring for other professionals; effectively motivate staff members.
  • manage unit resources (financial/human resources, as well as facilities & technology); use data to support decision-making.
  • consistently follow risk management protocols and explains intricacies of risk management situations to others.
  • seek opportunities to learn about issues of sustainability; assist in designing unit operations to incorporate sustainability.
  • participate in cross-unit collaborations to maximize resources.
  • contribute to and support the development of #RyersonSA sponsorship/fundraising efforts to generate new revenue.

ADVANCED

One should be able to:

  • interpret applicable recruiting/hiring policies and ensure compliance with these policies; lead search committees, facilitate multiple search processes to identify and recruit a strong pool of candidates; evaluate and re-organize or restructure job descriptions in anticipation of staffing needs.
  • interpret and apply policies/practices related to employee evaluation and supervision.
  • consistently motivate staff effectively, fairly & ethically.
  • coach/mentor other professionals on supervision philosophy & practice; consult with employees in regard to job performance as appropriate; manage and motivate in complex situations.
  • manage resources (financial and human resources, as well as facilities and technology) effectively across units; assess facility and technology effectively in resource allocation and long-term planning; persuasive in request for additional resources.
  • assess risk management protocols to determine effectiveness and develop new risk management protocols when needed.; train others in risk management protocols.
  • facilitate or create educational opportunities for others to learn about issues of sustainability; facilitate institutional support and efforts for sustainability issues.
  • manage 1 or more collaborative efforts to maximize resources.
  • develop and manage new ideas and opportunities to increase sponsorship/fundraising efforts to generate new revenue.

Assessment, Evaluation, & Storytelling Assessment, Evaluation & Storytelling


Demonstrating the effectiveness of our #RyersonSA work has proven to be the best mechanism for attracting new funding. Student Affairs professionals should understand how to design and use qualitative and quantitative data collection tools, analyze and interpret collected data, compare and contrast data with existing research, and tell a compelling story after that process.

BEGINNER

One should be able to:

  • understand the difference between learning objectives and learning outcomes by an understanding of what/how learning is evidenced; successfully write learning outcomes to assess evidenced learning and/or understanding; incorporate learning objectives in activities and programs.
  • create programs and activities related to department/unit objectives influenced by Ryerson University (ie Academic Plan).
  • articulate the difference between formative and evaluative assessment; utilize at least one method of assessment – Scope of work, Student/Client Satisfaction or Outcomes of Work.
  • understand the difference between qualitative, quantitative and anecdotal data; conduct basic data analysis with assistance.
  • use assessment results to incorporate some changes and improvements to work.
  • be aware of and engage with others’ use of formal (ie annual reports, funding applications) and informal (ie #RyersonSA blog, social media) methods for promoting assessment results.

INTERMEDIATE

One should be able to:

  • infuse learning objectives throughout their unit’s programs and services; draft clear learning objectives/outcomes for most programs & services; incorporate learning outcomes in activities and programs; champion the use and design of learning objectives and learning outcomes across department.
  • integrate #RyersonSA goals into curriculum/program planning and development; intentionally plan specific curriculum related to student needs and best practices; establish assessment plan for specific curriculum outcomes.
  • design assessment activities utilizing each of the 3 methods to varying degrees; embed cyclical assessments.
  • conduct basic data analysis, but require assistance with more sophisticated analysis techniques such as data coding from multiple sources of data; present data in conventional ways.
  • regularly report assessment results through formal (ie annual reports, funding applications) and informal (ie #RyersonSA blog, social media) methods.

ADVANCED

One should be able to:

  • create fully developed learning outcomes for various types of applications; integrate learning outcomes in all activities and programs which are connected to department assessment plan.
  • use research and understand trends that relate to specific programs/curricula; integrate best practices into curricula that is connected to the vision, mission, values of Ryerson University and #RyersonSA.
  • lead the creation of a comprehensive unit/dept assessment plan; introduce and use innovative methods of data collection; consider reliability, response rates and sample sizes in design of assessment activities; thinks critically about the data being collected (at least annually) and its usefulness and application; teach others across departments about assessment methods.
  • conduct complex data analysis utilizing a variety of methods; assist others in data analysis; present data in unconventional and innovative ways.
  • Teach and lead others as they use formal (i.e. annual reports, funding applications) and informal (i.e. #RyersonSA blog, social media) methods to promote assessment results.

Tech, Social Media, & Digital Engagement Tech, Social Media & Digital Engagement


To maintain engagement with and relevance to a largely-commuter and fast-paced student population, #RyersonSA focuses on the use of technology, social media, and digital tools to continue contributing to the advancement of student learning and development. Amongst ourselves and with our students, we will improve digital literacy and digital engagement skills. Continued and enhanced participation in the broader Student Affairs virtual community will be essential to the success of #RyersonSA as we work towards goals related to visibility, reach, and connection.

BEGINNER

One should be able to:

  • demonstrate adaptability in the face of fast-paced tech change.
  • remain current on student and staff adoption patterns of new technologies and familiarize oneself with the purpose and functionality of those technologies.
  • troubleshoot basic software, hardware & connectivity problems.
  • critically assess accuracy and quality of information gathered via technology; accurately cite electronic sources of information.
  • ensure compliance with accessible technology laws and policies.
  • demonstrate awareness of their digital identity and engage students in learning activities related to responsible digital communications and virtual community engagement.
  • appropriately utilize social media and other digital communication and collaboration tools to market and promote programs and services to students and staff.

INTERMEDIATE

One should be able to:

  • model and promote adaptability among staff and students in the face of fast-paced tech change; demonstrate openness to the introduction of new digital tools.
  • incorporate commonly utilized technological tools and platforms including social medial and other digital communication and collaboration tools into one’s work.
  • anticipate potential problems with software, hardware, and connectivity and proactively troubleshoot these problems.
  • utilize multiple digital strategies for accessing and assessing information, critically considering the sources of information.
  • using universal design principles, model and promote compliance with accessibility laws and policies among staff and students.
  • cultivate a digital identity, presence & reputation for themselves; model appropriate online behaviour and positive engagement.
  • design and assess outcomes that utilize social media and other digital communication and collaboration tools for promoting programs and services to students and staff.

ADVANCED

One should be able to:

  • anticipate technological change and innovation; advocate for adoption of new tools to meet the needs of students and staff.
  • provide leadership for the proactive creation, use, and evaluation of tech tools and digital spaces for students.
  • develop contingency plans for the continual operation of basic functions in the event of software, hardware, or connectivity failures.
  • teach others how to utilize digital strategies for accessing and assessing information.
  • lead and demonstrate a commitment to universal design. principles in tech and digital engagement implementation.
  • provide leadership and ongoing training for students and staff in their cultivation of a genuine digital identity, presence, and reputation.
  • provide leadership for the seamless integration of social media and digital communications with broader educational, customer service, marketing, and community engagement efforts.
  • provide leadership in leveraging technology in order to assess the impact of #RyersonSA programs and services on students and the broader Student Affairs community.

Empathy & Emotional Intelligence Empathy & Emotional Intelligence


Truly a hallmark of #RyersonSA, our staff strives for emotional well-being, emotional connectivity with students and other staff, and an authentic approach to humanity by developing empathetic practices. Understanding that by maintaining a positive view of human nature, we are better positioned to teach students adaptive behaviours and skill sets required for success. These goals help us to be more successful in our work as they allow us to participate in the transformative journey we help to create for our students.

BEGINNER

One should be able to:

  • accurately perceive their own and others’ emotions.
  • understand how emotions inform decision-making in professional situations.
  • practice and continually grow their own self-awareness; advocate for themselves in the workplace as needed.
  • understand the impact of intentional and active listening when engaging with students and others.
  • demonstrate an active curiosity about students and others.
  • understand what it means to possess a positive and growth-orientated mindset.
  • practice flexibility in ambiguous or unexpected situations.
  • be aware of emotional triggers that impact their capacity for stress management; understand what coping mechanisms are required when those triggers occur.
  • possess motivation for work that goes beyond money and status.

INTERMEDIATE

One should be able to:

  • understand the signals that emotions send in professional communication and relationships.
  • demonstrate consistently positive use of emotions as a contributor to decision-making in professional situations.
  • support others as they develop and practice their own self-awareness; support others as they advocate for their needs.
  • consistently practice intentional and active listening when engaging with students and others.
  • let others know what they have learned about them as a result of interaction with them.
  • consistently demonstrate a positive and growth-oriented mindset.
  • actively demonstrate the value of practicing flexibility in ambiguous or unexpected situations.
  • consistently manage stress levels by managing emotional triggers that elevate anxiety; activate coping mechanisms as required.
  • articulate and demonstrate motivation for work that goes beyond money and status.

ADVANCED

One should be able to:

  • manage their own and others’ emotions.
  • help others learn to positively use their emotions in decision-making in personal and professional situations.
  • identify when students are not developing/practicing self-awareness, and teach them skills needed for self-advocacy.
  • advocate for and teach the use of intentional and active listening to students and others.
  • teach students the value of curiosity and how it leads to enhanced sense of empathy and personal connection.
  • teach and advocate for the inclusion of a positive and growth-oriented mindset amongst students and colleagues.
  • advocate for and teach the practice of flexibility in ambiguous and unexpected situations to others.
  • coach others to understand and manage their own emotional triggers with aim of helping them learn to effectively manage stress; help others develop coping mechanisms.
  • make positive influence on others’ motivation for work through informal and formal means.

The 5 RyersonSA Pillars The 5 #RyersonSA Pillars


#RyersonSA defines its work across the division using the metaphor of 5 pillars which were developed assuming a strong foundation of equity, diversity, inclusion for students to ensure their access to and potential for success. Closely associated with one of 5 departments, each pillar should influence the work happening across #RyersonSA and should inspire collaboration within and between departments and units.

BEGINNER

One should be able to:

  • understand the foundational nature of the pillars and how they create a framework for the work of #RyersonSA .
  • participate in the evolution or creation of services and programs within their home department to promote their aligned pillar.

INTERMEDIATE

One should be able to:

  • participate in conversations with other #RyersonSA staff about the pillars, work happening across the division to promote them, how they influence our work, and how they serve as a framework for collaboration across the division.
  • Invite staff from other #RyersonSA departments to participate in services and programs to expose them to the value of their aligned pillar.

ADVANCED

One should be able to:

  • discuss the purpose and design of the pillars to individuals outside of #RyersonSA (at or outside the university).
  • purposefully and actively create and participate in cross-departmental collaborations that focus on promotion of 2 or more pillars.

Reflection Questions

  • Why is competence in this area important to #RyersonSA work?
  • How does competency in this area align with your own personal and professional goals?
  • What will growth in this area look like for you?